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HCA Minutes April.2018

In 2015 the HCA commissioned a report to review the District Plan. If you are new to the area or have never read this report, please take some time

To view this report click this link => HCA District Plan Review Report

Tim Rush is a jack of all trades – and master of most of them.

The versatile Oamaru cyclist was at it again last weekend, winning the Contact Epic mountain biking race around Lake Hawea.

Another Oamaru-based rider, professional ironman athlete Dougal Allan, was second.

It might have sneaked under the radar while everyone had eyes on the Commonwealth Games but the Epic is a big deal.

It attracts more than 700 competitors, and the feature race – a gruelling 125km trek – lives up to the “epic” name.

The race started at 7am on Saturday with the temperature gauge showing a balmy -1degC, and with several riverbed crossings along the way, there was no danger of the riders overheating.

Rush, a former New Zealand champion, was one of many regular road racers converting to the fatter-wheeled bikes for the event.

He and brother Kris joined Allan and former Alexandra professional road rider James Williamson in setting a blistering pace over the first 50km.

Steep hill climbs then took their toll and split the field. Tim Rush capitalised, built a handy lead and poured on the power on the hills to increase the buffer, eventually finishing in 4hr 38min.

Allan was 6min behind with Kris Rush claiming third after a sprint finish with Williamson.

Other North Otago cyclists to feature included Coast to Coast competitor Paul Gow (30th in open men 125km), David Rush (40th in masters men 125km) and Brett Stuart (44th in masters men 95km).

You stumble across a stunningly gorgeous spot in New Zealand’s great outdoors. Do you broadcast it on social media and risk a tourist invasion, or do you keep it a secret just for yourself and, maybe, a select few? Mark Price explores a problem of the modern age.

The tourism boom and the rise of social media is spawning a new way of thinking among New Zealanders who like to go bush.

Instead of promoting their favourite scenic landscapes, some New Zealanders are doing their best to keep them secret.

One is Wanaka landscape architect Anne Steven.

“I’m very loathe to publicise where I go now— the special places … because people just latch on to it and suddenly everybody’s there.”

Ms Steven is a well-known conservationist with an intimate knowledge of the Wanaka region.  But she has become more careful about whom she shares her knowledge with and gives an example of a “stunning view” she knows of that is still some distance from the beaten track. “I’m not going to tell anyone about it except for close friends and family.

“It stands to get trampled to death.”

Federated Mountain Clubs president Peter Wilson is another who has places he keeps secret.

“There are places I know, particularly in the high country, where I don’t tell people to go.

“I don’t put photos of my really special places on Facebook and on social media.

“There are a lot of places I go in the high country that have no visitors at all and I sort of want to keep it that way.”

He understood why others felt the same way. “There’s always been a debate about it and I just think the debate’s a wee bit louder at the moment.”

In the Wanaka region, that debate has been driven by the overcrowding of several local landscape features including Roys Peak, just west of Wanaka, which was climbed by 84,000 people in the 2017-18 year.

“Digital influencers” were encouraged to visit Wanaka … and a flood of tourists has followed in their footsteps to the point where the Department of Conservation was forced to build a new car park and install a toilet on the peak.

In an effort to spread the load, Lake Wanaka Tourism has recently created a map showing 24 other “photogenic locations”.

General manager James Helmore says the locations are deliberately spread around to reflect the broader region.  One of the “influencers” who popularised Roys Peak was American Chris Burkard (32) who has almost three million followers.

In a recent post, he acknowledged criticism had come his way but concluded the access track was in better shape now than when he first publicised it.

“Although the secret is out,I think it is better to have these places appreciated by many, rather than a select few,” he posted.

Giving away the location of “secret” places in Australia has caused grief for influencer Madeline Zotter (22) this week.

She was reported by the The New Zealand Herald as being upset over online abuse. “This weekend alone,” she said, “I received four abusive, unkind or negative messages because I wrote the location of a place.

“I am human, your words hurt and I spent a good part of my Easter — and this morning — crying.

“I have been called words such as a brat, told I am the reason for national parks being trashed and was even told to go back and stick my head under the water a little bit longer, purely because I listed the name of the place that others believe should be kept a secret.”

Both Mr Wilson and Ms Steven note the South Island has the advantage of a rugged landscape to protect many of it’s scenic secrets.

“It takes a bit of effort to get to some of the really special places that we like,” Mr Wilson said this week.

“We’re largely protected there.” He believes the “front country” — anything that takes less than a day’s walk to reach — is most at risk from over use. “If it’s a remote track and you

’ve got to cross a river, and it’s going to take two hard days to get in there, I’m not too worried. Publish all the photos you like.”

However, the Walking Access Commission’s newly released South Island High Country Access Report notes a trend that has become evident as popular areas have become overcrowded.

 

“This forces people who want an even quieter experience to push further afield, visiting areas that previously might have only been used by those wanting solitary experiences.

“These people are then forced to go even further into the back country, and so on.

“This displacement runs through three or four tiers, and means that some of our pristine wilderness areas are seeing increased numbers (even off a very small base) that they simply aren’t used to coping with.”

Mr Wilson believes there is a need for a more strategic approach around the marketing of New Zealand’s scenic attractions.

“I don’t think you would get any disagreement from the tourism industry on that.

“It’s just that we don’t have a mechanism to be strategic.

“There’s no plan. There’s not even an agency to do the plan.”

Snow-capped mountains, a glassy Lake Hawea and clear blue skies greeted  more than 700 mountain bike riders when they arrived to compete in the Contact Epic around the lake on Saturday.

Riders chose from  four events: the 160km Centurion, 125km Epic, 95km Classic and the 35km Traverse.

Race organiser Danielle Nicholson said it was an “amazing day”.

The race of the day was the Classic, where the top three riders were split by just four seconds at the finish after they raced for nearly four and a-half hours.

Sixteen-year-old Archie Martinovich, of Christchurch, won the battle, crossing the finish line in 4hr 20min 46sec, beating  Dunedin pair Jeremy Forlong and Andrew Fraser.

“It was very closely fought. We couldn’t tell who was in the lead at various times.”

Ms Nicholson said Martinovich showed great sportsmanship before his event,  scrapping his own race preparation as he helped change a tyre for a woman who had  a puncture on the start line.

“It’s great to see a kid like that in our sport,” Ms Nicholson said.

Clinton’s Jo McKenzie won the women’s title in 5hr 28min 34sec, followed by Kara Wandless of Invercargill and Shelley Alexander of Hawea Flat.

In the Epic, Oamaru’s Tim Rush beat home three-times champion Dougal Allan, of Wanaka, in 4hr 38min 49sec. Rush’s brother Kris  was  third.

In the women’s event, Wanaka’s Simone Maier beat  seven-times champion Kath Kelly, of Roxburgh, crossing the line in  5hr 29min 37sec. Auckland’s Harriet Beaven was  third.

Alexandra’s Mike Sangster won the gruelling 160km Centurion race in  6hr 43min 26sec.

Mark Williams, of Queenstown, was second ahead of John Mezger, of Wanaka.

Ronel Cook, of Dunedin, won the women’s 160km race  in 8hr 17min 06sec, ahead of Cromwell’s Teresa Noble and Christchurch’s Hannah Johnston.

Finally in the shortest race, the Traverse, Mitch Tawera, of Wanaka, defended the men’s title in 1hr 20min 09sec, followed by Tane Tawera, of Wanaka, and Jamie Henderson, of Christchurch.

Kim Cadzow (16), of Tauranga, won the women’s race in 1hr 31min 43sec ahead of Kaiapoi’s Sjaan Lykles and Christchurch’s Jane McDonald.

 

At a full meeting of the Queenstown Lakes District Council in Lake Hawea yesterday, residents used the public forum to highlight their concerns about the council’s plans to permanently chlorinate the water supply.

Hawea Community Association chairman Paul Cunningham said there was a strong opposition in the town to permanent chlorination and a thorough public consultation process was needed.

Until there was a full report from council staff on the chlorination issue, it should not go ahead, Mr Cunningham said.

Hawea Stand for Pure Water spokeswoman Jennifer Rumore said the council had not explored any alternatives to chlorination.

“What we want is for you to research and offer other alternatives to the chlorination of our water. It is precious to us.”

Lake Hawea resident and former Niwa chief scientist Dr Don Robertson told the councillors he was not against chlorination but was against permanent chlorination without evidence, which he said was the case with this proposal.

More members of the public wanted to speak on the issue but the council allowed only three speakers on one issue during the public forum.

After each of the submitters spoke, there was loud applause from the large number of residents at the meeting.

Mr Boult said he understood it was an emotional issue for the Lake Hawea community but the council needed to make a decision that protected the entire district.

The council was not blind to the concerns people had but it was councillors and council staff who could face prosecution if they had not done everything they could to protect residents from a situation such as happened in Havelock North, he said.

Minutes.March.2018

The new picnic table is in place at the Hawea boat ramp and is looking superb.

We hope you enjoy this new facility and agree it’s a fine looking table!

 

 

 

A picnic table with a view

Click the link below to view the Hawea Community Association Meeting Minutes for February 2017

HCA Confirmed Minutes 22 February 2017

Click the link below to view the Hawea Community Association Meeting Minutes for December 2016

HCA Confirmed Minutes 20 December 2016

Hawea Community Association Membership

By becoming a member of the Hawea Community Association you are: helping support the development of the Hawea community in many different areas are able to have a voice in these matters.   Only $20 per household.   Membership subs can be paid in 3 ways: Post cheque to Secretary HCA, 179 Cemetery Road, Lake Hawea, 9382 Bank Account: Hawea Community Associat read more »

Minutes of the HCA Executive Meeting April 2018

HCA Minutes April.2018 read more »

HCA District Plan Review 2015 commissioned by HCA

In 2015 the HCA commissioned a report to review the District Plan. If you are new to the area or have never read this report, please take some time To view this report click this link => HCA District Plan Review Report read more »

Rush continues epic form

Tim Rush is a jack of all trades – and master of most of them. The versatile Oamaru cyclist was at it again last weekend, winning the Contact Epic mountain biking race around Lake Hawea. Another Oamaru-based rider, professional ironman athlete Dougal Allan, was second. It might have sneaked under the radar while everyone had eyes on the Commonwealth Games but the Epic is a big deal. read more »

HCA Constitution

Revised HCA Constitution 11 November 2014 read more »

Hawea Flat Domain Food Forest Working Bee

Monthly Hawea Food Forest Working Bee 5th May 10am to 2pm (Postponed to Sunday if raining cats and dogs) Hi folks. We're re-kickstarting this project. We aim to create some continuity with a monthly working bee on the first Saturday of every month. Come along and get involved. We'd love to see you down here.   Jobs to get done on the day. -Working on finishing the Plan read more »

Hawea Playgroup Annual Garage Sale – Not to be missed!

read more »

Thank the Volunteers – Pot Luck Dinner on 27th April 2018

In Hawea we have a wide range of volunteers who help to keep our community a vibrant and pleasant place in which to live. These volunteers give up their time to serve in a wide range of services and activities – from the fire brigade and the Thursday foreshore working group; to the sports clubs; school and community support groups etc. Every two years we take time to acknowledge and thank read more »

Keeping secrets of the beautiful bush

You stumble across a stunningly gorgeous spot in New Zealand’s great outdoors. Do you broadcast it on social media and risk a tourist invasion, or do you keep it a secret just for yourself and, maybe, a select few? Mark Price explores a problem of the modern age. The tourism boom and the rise of social media is spawning a new way of thinking among New Zealanders who like to go bush. read more »

HCA Public Meeting – Saturday 21st April

The HCA will be holding their next Public Meeting to hear about the issues that are of concern or interest to you in our community - starting at 10.00 am on Saturday 21st April - at the Lake Hawea Community Centre.    Come along earlier for a morning cup of tea and chat ... This meeting will provide an opportunity to find out more about recent issues and developments in our Hawe read more »

Top three riders separated by 4sec in Epic race finish

Snow-capped mountains, a glassy Lake Hawea and clear blue skies greeted  more than 700 mountain bike riders when they arrived to compete in the Contact Epic around the lake on Saturday. Riders chose from  four events: the 160km Centurion, 125km Epic, 95km Classic and the 35km Traverse. Race organiser Danielle Nicholson said it was an "amazing day". The race of the day was the Classic, w read more »