Latest Community Projects

Monthly Hawea Food Forest Working Bee

5th May 10am to 2pm (Postponed to Sunday if raining cats and dogs)
Hi folks.
We’re re-kickstarting this project. We aim to create some continuity with a monthly working bee on the first Saturday of every month.
Come along and get involved. We’d love to see you down here.
 
Jobs to get done on the day.
-Working on finishing the Plant Nursery.
-Tidying up the edge of the nursery/weedeating and putting carpet down.
-Putting up windbreak around nursery.
-Transporting to the nursery and Weeding some apple rootstock.
-Tidying up around water tank. Carpet down if available.
-General Mowing/weed eating.
-Weeding around fruit trees
To bring along if able to.
Weedeater/Wipper snipper
Ride on mowers/ grunty push mower
Old Carpet
Gardening gloves
Spare Native plants?
Spare edible plants?

The new picnic table is in place at the Hawea boat ramp and is looking superb.

We hope you enjoy this new facility and agree it’s a fine looking table!

 

 

 

A picnic table with a view

20 February 2014

Nichola Greaves

Queenstown Lakes District Council
Private Bag 50072
Queenstown 9348

Rachel Ozanne

Otago Regional Council
PO Box 1954
Dunedin 9054

Dear Nichola and Rachel

Re Monitoring of Lake Hawea

The Lake Hawea Community Association and the Guardians of Lake Hawea are seeking information from both Queenstown Lakes District Council (QLDC) and Otago Regional Council (ORC) about the monitoring of E.coli and any other monitoring of ecosystems and water quality in Lake Hawea.  We are seeking information from both ORC and QLDC to address community concerns about water quality and also because we are unclear as to the boundaries between responsibilities of the two councils as it relates to lake, river and groundwater monitoring. Some of our earlier questions about the E.coli monitoring were answered by the brief report  “Lake Hawea Water January 2014 E.coli event” from QLDC and we thank you Nichola for sending that, however there is quite a lot of local interest in issues of water quality and we have some additional questions.

Questions for QLDC:

  1. How frequently are samples taken to test for E.coli?
  2. How many and where and are the lake samples taken – upstream of the water supply intake?
  3. Why are so few samples taken in the town reticulation system (as indicated in your January report)?
  4. Where & by whom are the samples tested?
  5. What is the Most Probable Number of E.coli/100ml, (and how many such positive samples are required) to trigger a boil water notice, and/or the use of chlorination? What triggers the chlorination being stopped?
  6. At what level of E.coli in the incoming water does the UV system fail to provide adequate protection?
  7. How long will chlorination be continued following the January event? We understand it is still being applied.
  8. Is the community notified when the chlorination is stopped and how is this notification done?
  9. How long does it take for chlorine to clear the town water reticulation system once application is stopped?
  10. Does QLDC monitor for hyper chlorination?
  11. Who has responsibility for tracking the likely source of contamination by E.coli?
  12. Can the HCA please have a copy of the past E.coli, pH and turbidity data collected for Lake Hawea.
  13. At what level of lake water turbidity does the UV treatment become compromised?

 Questions for ORC:

1. What biological or physical attributes are being monitored in Lake Hawea and in any of the lake catchments, by the ORC and/or subcontractors?

2. How are these being measured?

3. How frequently are these measurements being undertaken?

4. What sites around the lake are used for the measurements?

5. Can you list any other monitoring of the Hawea River and the Hawea Basin aquifer?

Questions for both ORC & QLDC:

How do QLDC and ORC cooperate on aspects of their statutory roles with respect to monitoring Lake Hawea and catchments, the Hawea River and Hawea Basin Aquifer?

  1. Are there any areas of overlap in QLDC-ORC responsibilities with respect to these water bodies?
  2. Are there any gaps you are aware of between the two organisations responsibilities with respect to these water bodies?

We look forward to hearing back from you both.

Yours sincerely

 Alison Brown
Secretary, Guardians of Lake Hawea
 
Don Robertson
Vice Chair Hawea Community Association

  Cc:          The residents of Lake Hawea and Hawea Flat

                 Chief Executive Officer (QLDC)
                 Chief Executive Officer (ORC)

25 February 2014

 Adam Feeley
Queenstown Lakes District Council
Private Bag 50072
QUEENSTOWN 9348
 
 Peter Bodeker
Otago Regional Council
PO Box 1954
DUNEDIN 9054

Dear Adam and Peter

 WATER QUALITY CONCERNS

For your information we (Mike Cotter, Chairman, Guardians of Lake Hawea, and Dennis Hughes, Chairman, Hawea Community Association) are providing you with a copy of a letter about water quality matters written to Nichola Greaves (QLDC) and Rachel Ozanne (ORC).

In providing you with this correspondence we make the following three points:

1.  The genesis of the attached letter was heightened concerns, on the part of Hawea citizens, about the quality of drinking water following the January 2014 Hawea E. coli ‘boil water event’.

2.  Both the Guardians and the Hawea Community Association (HCA) were impressed with Council’s text-book implementation of the January boil water notice.  At peak holiday time, using all available media services, Council quickly and effectively conveyed and explained the boil water notice.

3.  Following that event, and in response to numerous and ongoing citizen enquiries about water quality and the continued chlorination of Hawea drinking water, the Guardians and HCA convened a group of local scientists and informed citizens to guide our management of this matter.  Our first steps are to seek reassurance about the robustness of current water testing practices and to become better informed about the management of our freshwater resources.

To that end the attached letter comprises a series of questions for your organization’s consideration.

We look forward to your response and signal our willingness for it to be a conversation about current practice and, in the light of the Government’s current review of freshwater management, what lies ahead.

Yours sincerely,

Mike Cotter                                                              Dennis Hughes

Chairman                                                                  Chairman
Guardians of Lake Hawea                                      Hawea Community Association

This has been set up beside Sailz Café at Lake Hawea

Exchange /  Help Yourself / Drop Off

Wanaka Time Bank is a community group that facilitates sharing of our resources, skills and services to create abundance within our community for all.

Have you ever thought you’d love to trade your skills with another person’s skills? Perhaps you’re an IT whiz & you’d like someone to help you prune your fruit trees? Or a gardener that needs their pants hemmed, or a birthday invitation designed? The Wanaka Time Bank is now up and running and we’d love you to join this community led incentive. Instead of dollars, time credits are used as the form of exchange. Join today! You’ll be surprised at what’s on offer … www.wanakatimebank.org … Wanaka TimeBank, creating community one trade at a time.

 

A Lake Hawea father has unanimous support from the Wanaka Community Board to set up a children’s BMX park in the township.

Geoff Small put his proposal for a bike track on Queenstown Lakes District Council-owned land on the corner of Domain Rd and Noema Tce to the community board last week.

The father of two said while there were plenty of natural recreational opportunities in the area, children needed a “healthy outlet” in a location that was easy for parents to monitor.

The long, narrow site was perfect for a children’s BMX track because it was naturally downhill to flat. With the help of a professional track shaper, Mr Small is proposing a 150m-long hummocky track which would suit all ages – younger children could “roll through” it, while the older kids could jump.

He had written approval from four of the five neighbours.

The environmental impact would be small, with just some dirt needed to create the jumps, he said.

“There’s nothing like a pile of dirt for kids to play with.”

Mr Small, a professional skier who also has an impressive number of mountainbiking titles under his belt, said BMX racing as a child was one of the ways he learned about healthy competition and the consequences of taking risks.

“That’s an important lesson to learn early, rather than jumping in a car.”

There were already “20 odd” children in Lake Hawea who met regularly to ride their BMX and the number of young families living in the area was growing.

Many sports were costly – both in terms of money and caregivers’ time – and BMX provided a less expensive alternative.

The community board agreed to support the bike park in principle, providing any safety or resource consent requirements were met and affected neighbours gave their approval.

 

Report from Rachel Brown. President HCA, 17 April 2013

Dear Hawea ratepayer

Here is my report on the Hawea Community Association’s consultation with local residents and ratepayers  about Contact Energy’s proposed enhancement of the Gladstone Gap area.

BACKGROUND

Contact Energy owns the land at Gladstone Gap and, as part of its resource consent for using the waters of Lake Hawea for electricity generation, has committed to some landscape development.  Last November Contact Energy asked the Hawea Community Association  to ascertain what the community would like to see happen at Gladstone Gap.

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION

Following discussions within the HCA and with the Guardians of Lake Hawea about Contact Energy’s request, two consultation initiatives were undertaken.  Firstly an on-site public meeting at Gladstone Gap on 21 January was attended by 36 residents.

Next the HCA sent out information about the issue to all Hawea ratepayers with a request to return a survey form; this was completed by 162 people.

CONSULTATION FINDINGS

Analysis of the data from both consultations revealed the following four key findings:

  1.  The prevailing attitude to enhancement of the Gladstone Gap area was that it should be minimal and sensitive to the wild and more remote feeling of the area that people presently enjoy. The planting of shade/shelter trees was heavily supported.
  2.  Community feedback obtained from the 162 questionnaires echoed the  messages expressed by the 36 attendees at the January on-site public meeting in their strong support for:

(i) plantings to enhance shade and shelter

(ii) the provision of a toilet

(iii) the provision of perimeter-parking for people who drive to the eastern end of Lakeview Terrace and then access the Gladstone Gap lake frontage by foot or bike.

There was split support (half yes half no) for

(iv) improved track access for people to walk, cycle or be pushed (wheel-chair, baby strollers) into the area.

The HCA reads these results as a mandate to recommend i,ii and iii, and come up with a solution for iv that bridges the gap in opinion.

  1.  At the onsite meeting participants expressed limited support for the provision of picnic facilities (tables, litter bins etc);  the questionnaire feedback recorded strong support for the provision of picnic furniture
  2. Both consultations elicited minority support for vehicle access to the Gladstone Gap foreshore at the present time.

WHAT NEXT?

The HCA executive has fully considered the consultation feedback and made it available to Contact Energy along with the following recommendation.

Recommendation to Contact Energy

The HCA believes deciding now on a short and long term management plan for Gladstone Gap will be advantageous for present and future dealings with this area. This plan should be reviewed every five years.  

The Hawea Community Association therefore recommends to Contact Energy the following actions at Gladstone Gap

Do now:

  1. Draw up a landscape plan for Gladstone Gap to use as the master plan and to make available to the public.
  2. Plant nodes of trees to create zones of shade and shelter – these should be along the edges of Gladstone Gap ranging from near the lake to further inland. A range of native, limited exotic and even perhaps fruit trees is recommended.
  3. Provide irrigation to these trees.
  4. Install a composting toilet at Gladstone Gap, tucked discretely in plantings.
  5.  Provide a small car park accessed through the gate at the east end of Lakeview Terrace for people to leave their cars off the road while using the walking/cycling track. See map.
  6. Link the carpark with the existing walking/cycling track to Gladstone Gap with a discrete track through the scrub that meets the existing track at the top of the final sloping descent into the Gap. Ensure this whole track is wheelchair and baby buggy friendly.  See map.
    1. Clear some of the scrub inhibiting access to the beach.
    2. Arrange availability of key to locked gate on Contact land to allow vehicular access for people with special mobility needs.

 

Do later, if public demand and opinion changes:

Upgrade access track to allow vehicular access to Gladstone Gap

 

I will meet with Contact Energy to discuss the enhancement of Gladstone Gap and ask them to commit to what will be considered the first phase of development.

HCA will work with Contact Energy to expedite the developments and, at the same time, consult with nearby residents and landowners about a perimeter-parking site that does not impact negatively on views of the lake and mountains.

 

STEP-BY-STEP DEVELOPMENT

When developing recreational and community facilities it makes good sense to respond to what we see and know is happening and, with this staged approach to enhancement of the Gladstone Gap, we can do just that.  In the course of the next few years, residents, track users, Contact Energy, Guardians and HCA can quietly monitor any changes and trends in the use of this area and, with that information, shape further enhancement initiatives that  fit with what is happening and what is needed.

 

Thus, while it is utimately up to Contact Energy what happens at Gladstone Gap, the Hawea community has delivered a strong message they want to both preserve this area and keep it accessible. The acceptable level of access is an issue to be reviewed. In about 5 years, when the shade and shelter plantings are established and beginning to enhance the Gladstone Gap area, a further round of community consultation will take place to discuss  any emerging or changing  issues/needs.

 

Finally, I thank those residents who made positive comments about HCA’s consultation.  We endeavour to represent our community.  I also thank Contact Energy for its strong community partnership.

Rachel Brown

President, Hawea Community Association

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALYSIS OF CONSULTATION FEEDBACK

 

 

ON-SITE MEETING FEEDBACK

The January onsite consultation meeting invited open discussion.  The 36 attendees strongly endorsed shade & shelter planting enhancements.  Strong argument was voiced for improved track access for walkers, hikers, cyclists, people in wheelchairs and children/infants in strollers; the provision of a toilet, and perimeter parking.  A show of hands elicited limited support for vehicle road access to the Gladstone Gap shoreline (4-6 hands) and revealed substantial numbers (24+ hands) wanting the area kept vehicle free. It was suggested that people with limited mobility could obtain a key from Contact and use the existent basic vehicle track into Gladstone Gap. Limited support for picnic furniture contrasted with the prevailing wish that people enjoy the area in ways consistent with the use of wilderness areas.

 

 

QUESTIONNAIRE FEEDBACK

 

  1. 1.             162 responses to the yes/no questions:

 

 “Do you support…

YES

NO

     basic landscaping?” (plantings)

148   (91%)

14   (9%)

     provision of picnic tables?”

148   (91%)

14   (9%)

     provision of composting toilet?”

128   (85%)

23   (15%)

     construction of a car park?”

135   (85%)

23   (15%)

     a well-graded track?”

83   (52%)

76   (48%)

    future development of a road?”

58   (37%)

100   (63%)

 

 

2.    308 written comments from 84 respondents:

 

Many of the written comments echoed common themes/arguments.  Five key themes are evident.

 

Theme 1:  It’s a precious wilderness area – don’t ruin it.

  • “Leave it wild.  We don’t need to landscape the whole lake front”.
  • “Please leave us with one unspoilt area.  It is important to have a little of the natural area retained”.
  • “No more inappropriate ‘suburbanisation’ of our foreshore”.
  • “Keep it wild”.
  • “Wind shelter – most important”.
  • “It is very important to preserve the remaining farmland/lake interface.  It is such a special part of that end of the lake front – uniquely Lake Hawea”.

 

 Theme 2:   Keep vehicles out

  • “It is special to have areas that cars cannot access”.
  • “Can we try to have a ‘road free place?”
  • “I believe the area should be free of motorised vehicles.  Tramping, walkers and bikers – ok”.
  • “Definitely no cars into this precious much-used wilderness area”.

 

Theme 3:   We want a toilet

  • “Yes – high priority”.
  • “Yes – very necessary”.
  • “This is a must right now for users of the existing track”.
  • “Really need a toilet at Gladstone Gap.  A composting toilet would be great”.

 

Theme 4:   Accessing the area – a well graded track

  • “Make area more accessible”.
  • “Yes – a discrete access track for foot or wheelchair traffic, but not for vehicles”.
  • “An access track, separate from the present cycling/walking track”.
  • “Not now – do it when plantings have become established”.

 

Theme 5:   Perimeter parking is needed

  • “A small car park that is not visible when approaching L. Hawea via Muir Road.  That vista is one of Hawea’s iconic views – across golden grass”.
  • Yes – people need somewhere to park so they can walk into the Gladstone Gap”.
  • “No, as long as there is a track from a car park we do not need a road right into GG’.
  • “Provide access to this area for bike and foot traffic only.  People should be able to park and walk to the Gladstone Gap’.
  • “Yes, an aging population, disability etc encourage a functional yet unobstructive car park”.

 

Please take time to fill out our survey on enhancement at Gladstone Gap

Click on the link http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FBPVPTS

Newsletter December 2012

Hawea Flat Domain Food Forest Working Bee

Monthly Hawea Food Forest Working Bee 5th May 10am to 2pm (Postponed to Sunday if raining cats and dogs) Hi folks. We're re-kickstarting this project. We aim to create some continuity with a monthly working bee on the first Saturday of every month. Come along and get involved. We'd love to see you down here.   Jobs to get done on the day. -Working on finishing the Plan read more »

New picnic table installed

The new picnic table is in place at the Hawea boat ramp and is looking superb. We hope you enjoy this new facility and agree it's a fine looking table!       [caption id="attachment_893" align="alignleft" width="300"] A picnic table with a view[/caption] read more »

Letter Re Monitoring of Lake Hawea to QLDC and ORC

20 February 2014 Nichola Greaves Queenstown Lakes District CouncilPrivate Bag 50072Queenstown 9348Rachel Ozanne Otago Regional CouncilPO Box 1954Dunedin 9054Dear Nichola and Rachel Re Monitoring of Lake Hawea The Lake Hawea Community Association and the Guardians of Lake Hawea are seeking information from both Queenstown Lakes District Council (QLDC) and Otago Regional Council (ORC) read more »

Hawea Water Quality cover letter to QLDC & ORC

25 February 2014  Adam FeeleyQueenstown Lakes District CouncilPrivate Bag 50072QUEENSTOWN 9348  Peter BodekerOtago Regional CouncilPO Box 1954DUNEDIN 9054Dear Adam and Peter  WATER QUALITY CONCERNS For your information we (Mike Cotter, Chairman, Guardians of Lake Hawea, and Dennis Hughes, Chairman, Hawea Community Association) are providing you with a copy of a letter about water qua read more »

Community Plant Swap

This has been set up beside Sailz Café at Lake Hawea Exchange /  Help Yourself / Drop Off read more »

Wanaka Time Bank

Wanaka Time Bank is a community group that facilitates sharing of our resources, skills and services to create abundance within our community for all. Have you ever thought you'd love to trade your skills with another person's skills? Perhaps you're an IT whiz & you'd like someone to help you prune your fruit trees? Or a gardener that needs their pants hemmed, or a birthday invitation des read more »

A Lake Hawea father has unanimous support from the Wanaka Community Board to set up a children's BMX park in the township. Geoff Small put his proposal for a bike track on Queenstown Lakes District Council-owned land on the corner of Domain Rd and Noema Tce to the community board last week. The father of two said while there were plenty of natural recreational opportunities in the area, chil read more »

GLADSTONE GAP ENHANCEMENT – COMMUNITY CONSULTATION

Report from Rachel Brown. President HCA, 17 April 2013 Dear Hawea ratepayer Here is my report on the Hawea Community Association’s consultation with local residents and ratepayers  about Contact Energy’s proposed enhancement of the Gladstone Gap area. BACKGROUND Contact Energy owns the land at Gladstone Gap and, as part of its resource consent for using the waters of Lake Hawea fo read more »

Gladstone Gap Enhancement Survey 2013

Please take time to fill out our survey on enhancement at Gladstone Gap Click on the link http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FBPVPTS read more »

December Newsletter 2012

Newsletter December 2012 read more »